Lothian & Border Horse Yeomanry trooper's tunic, WW1





3 thoughts on “Lothian & Border Horse Yeomanry trooper's tunic, WW1”

  1. Pamela Faulks says:

    I have a hunting stick which I bought at an auction ten years ago. It was presented to S.Q.M.S. Caverhill on the occasion of his leaving to take up his commission June 1916. I often wonder what happened to him?

  2. Pamela Faulks says:

    I have a hunting stick which I bought at an auction ten years ago. It was presented to S.Q.M.S. Caverhill on the occasion of his leaving to take up his commission June 1916. I often wonder what happened to him?

  3. Malcolm Rae Dickson says:

    My grandfather, John Hutcheson Dickson (1897-1974) and his best friend Robert Rae, both farmer’s sons and keen horsemen, travelled from the Kelso area to Haddington on 5th October, 1914. John had just turned 17 and Robert (Bob) was a week short of his 19th birthday. They volunteered and joined Lothians and Border Horse. I understand that the regiment was trained in Amisfield Park, now of course the Haddington Golf Course. JHD didn’t enter the theatre of war until 22 September 1915 in France, suggesting that he was part of ‘D’ Squadron of his regiment, but I believe he was only there for a matter of weeks before ‘A’ and ‘D’ Squadrons were posted to Salonica to shore up what could be salvaged from the fighting with the Turks there. I suspect they remained there until either being commissioned or the end of the war. Both young men were indeed commissioned, I think in 1918, JHD to the Northumberland Fusiliers, and Bob Rae to the Royal Artillery. JHD later volunteered for the Royal Flying Corps and was accepted and even underwent some training. However the war ended before he could fly in action. Both survived the war although poor Bob succumbed to diphtheria in 1919 and therefore never lived to see John Dickson marry his sister Catherine Cunningham Rae in 1922, shortly after which their parents bought them a farm from the Spottiswoode Estate which was being sold off near Westruther, Berwickshire. That farm, Howlet’s Ha’ is where I and my siblings were raised, although it is no longer in the family.

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